BJJ Grrl

"Be gentle, kind and beautiful, yet firm and strong, both mentally and physically." ~Sensei Keiko Fukuda

Cut it off

on December 13, 2010

Tim has kicked me out of classes for the rest of the week. I’m allowed to come Wednesday and teach the kids, but that’s it. Not even Saturday. And can’t even come and watch.

It’s not fair. I’m not a wimp, and I resent being treated like one. The boys get to train with injuries and even telling people to go light. I tape it/wrap it/whatever and specifically tell everyone that they don’t have to go light and that they should train with me as normal and that they ought to take advantage of that side, and I still get booted. (If they grab it and immediately draw back with an “Oh, sorry,” I remind them that it’s fine to grab and put weight on and everything. And sometimes if they can’t get the underhook because I’m concentrating so much on keeping that arm tight and out of the way [because it’s not fair if I stick it in my belt and say I won’t use it but then try to use my elbow anyway], I’ll loosen the elbow and let them in there. They would get it normally, so I let them have it. I just don’t want it cranked on or overstretched. Don’t they call it “active rest”?) I don’t care if I get triangled or RNC’d or swept or passed or choked because I don’t have an arm to defend. I just want to train.

And here when it’s the best time of the year to train, with most spazzy white belts busy with exams or gone home for winter break. Grr.

Next time I just won’t even mention it.

Another appointment with Dr. Tom tonight, and another on Wednesday. Shoulder’s mostly better; a little uncomfortable and achy, but not like it was last week. Now there are actually positions where it doesn’t hurt (though they’re rather odd ones, like straight out to the side), and Tom gave me some stretches and told me to watch my posture (no more slouching) and that seems to have made a difference.

Rolling to start class. With Andrew, the newest blue. I might be getting better at this one-armed stuff, especially now that I’ve realized the main problem is that I balance so much with my hands. (I’ve even figured out why I do that, and so can consciously choose to do it when I need to and can remind myself not to do it the rest of the time.) I’ll probably roll one-armed on purpose even when the shoulder is better. (And on the other side, so it can catch up.) Mostly worked to engage my hips more for balance and on keeping my lower back from rounding (which kicks my hips out of the picture). I know it’s a combination of him still working very hard to stick with technique and trying to go a little easier despite my telling him not to, and yes, I have to work a whole lot harder, but hang it all, I felt like I was doing decently.

Then a round with Steve. Right before this round is when Tim told me I’m done for the week, so I was a mad at him and trying to take it out on Steve. (Poor guy.) I’ve got one arm, and I can sweep a guy who’s defending. Who is it that can’t train with only one arm? Isn’t me. (And yeah, he was also probably going a little easier, but still.) Even defended triangles, and I usually can’t get out Steve’s triangles even with both arms. Just sayin’. Okay, so I couldn’t pass, but I always have a hard time passing Steve because he’s little and squirmy and uses it. Grouchy.

Drilling was a guard break and pass. Drilled with Theresa. This was actually something I could drill on her, so got a few reps myself. One more roll, with Theresa. The boys may hesitate over taking advantage of that missing arm, but she certainly doesn’t. She tried to cross-collar choke me from mount once; I turned to keep that first grip on top, but that put my trapped arm on top, too. She complained that she wanted to armbar me but there was no arm; I asked her what else she knew from there, and after a moment she started working towards a bow-and-arrow choke. A few nudges in the right direction, and she had it. Then later, she was trying to triangle me, but I’d tucked the arm around her leg; with anyone else that means an omoplata is coming, but she doesn’t know that yet. As she was trying to work out how to free that arm, I noticed that two or three groups of guys were getting very close to us, and we were already near the wall. So I told her to lock that triangle in tight and hold on, then picked her up and walked to the far side of the mat, where there was plenty of space. Set her down and we continued.

Well, at least I picked up Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion last week, so I’ll have something to entertain myself. (As long as I can remember to drop Sneak mode before talking to people, because I keep accidentally stealing from them and getting arrested. Doh!)

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10 responses to “Cut it off

  1. Laura says:

    Hey, I know you’re mad about Tim telling you to go home and stay there, but I don’t think he is wrong. He knows that you want to train, and will train, but that you need a rest. And that you are going to keep pushing yourself; it might be until you end up really getting hurt.

    BJJ will still be there waiting for you.

  2. Zen Mojo says:

    Jui Jitsu will still be there when you get back. Training “around” injuries is something we all do but when an injury isn’t consistently improving or the risk of re-injury is too high you just have to take a break sometime.

    Considering how you trained for this tournament, your body could use some time off, even without the injuries.

    Active rest means doing something completely different from your sport or activity and usually at a much reduced intensity level. Find some activities you can do that do not irritate your injuries and have some play time.

    You will come back rested, stronger, and healthier – and that will let you accelerate your training to the next level.

  3. slideyfoot says:

    I used to love Daggerfall, but got a bit annoyed at the linearity of Morrowind, so haven’t really paid much attention to the Elder Scrolls since then.

    The coolest thing about Daggerfall was how you weren’t pushed into any particular direction, and could pretty much ignore the central plot and mess around on guild quests most of the time.

    Then again, I don’t seem to have time for computer games these days, which is a shame (although most of the RPGs released over the last few years seem to be those irritating online ones, rather than the solo stuff I prefer).

  4. clinzy says:

    Tim is right to kick you out, as much as you don’t want to hear it. And, he’s probably kicking you out because you DIDN’T ask people to go light on your injured shoulder. You don’t need to be a hero. Everyone knows you’re tough. Now, rest. Play video games. Eat like crap. Take care of your shoulder. Maybe go have dinner with someone you haven’t seen since you started BJJ.

    Oh, and @Slideyfoot – Oblivion is waaaay better than Morrowind. They went back to letting you roam all around and do whatever you want.

  5. slideyfoot says:

    Really? Cool – I’ll have to take another look at the Bethesda stuff when I next find myself with lots of time to play with (also need to finally complete Amberstar, although that’s bound up with so much nostalgia it would be pretty sad to finish it). I see they’re planning on bringing out an Elder Scrolls V, so hopefully that will keep the non-linear thing going.

  6. leslie says:

    @Laura: Oh, I know, I’m just pouting. I hate missing anything.

    @Zen Mojo: Yeah, I know I’m doing active rest wrong. 😛 But I don’t sit still very well.

    @Slidey: Lots of wandering in Oblivion. The map is gigantic. And nearly everyone I’ve talked to has offered me a side quest. (Well, the ones I haven’t accidentally stolen from, that is.) Also, I got the “Game of the Year” edition, and if I understand it right, there are 2 add-ons (?), so more stuff to do.

    @Chrissy: But I like being the hero. Damsel is no fun.

  7. Kirsch says:

    Leslie, based on my reading of this post, I think I can accurately make a diagnosis on your condition.

    You suffer from an acute case of FOMA, which is a deep rooted “Fear of Missing Out” which leads individuals to act irrationally and against their better judgement. Common symptoms include:

    1) An inability to leave a bar before last call.
    2) Repeatedly sparring while needing to hide your arm in your belt to avoid injury.

    ;^)

  8. leslie says:

    @Kirsch: Ack! Busted!

    Yes, that’s probably the deeper, driving force behind everything. *guilty look* But I really really don’t like to miss things!

  9. Neil says:

    Good! Won’t do you any harm at all. He probably should have done it the week before the tournament but I can’t imagine how bad you’d have cracked it then 😀

    Congrats on the tournament btw. Looking forward to getting a chance to watch the videos.

  10. T says:

    I dislocated my arm on Haloween of 2009. Since then, it’s popped out twice in training. And not because my arm was being attacked. I was being stacked while doing an omoplata and my shoulder couldn’t hold itself together, same scenario both times.
    Since then I’ve always kept my arm inside my belt and I ask the rough guys to go light.
    It’s a pain in the ass and I’m not progressing as much as I could have, I don’t do tournaments. It sucks, but I’m still doing Jiujitsu so I’m happy.
    From one frustrated grappler to another, hang in there.

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